Category Archives: mental health

Rosecrance names Anne Fridh, PsyD., to new role as administrator of Ware Center

Fridh brings clinical and administrative experience to position

annefridh_smallROCKFORD – Anne Fridh, PsyD., has been named Administrator of the Rosecrance Ware Center, a role to which she brings more than two decades of experience and leadership in behavioral healthcare.

In her new position, she will oversee adult mental health operations, including triage emergency services and the crisis residential program, soon to be combined in the creation of the Crisis Stabilization Center in downtown Rockford.

In addition, she will oversee the move of adult outpatient mental health services from the current location at the Ware Center on West State Street in downtown Rockford to a new location on North Main Street. Rosecrance is renovating a long-vacant former grocery store in the 2700 block of North Main Street in order to relocate the Ware Center to that site. The move will allow for program improvements, and the space is being designed to meet the needs of clients and staff. A complete overhaul of the site includes major aesthetic improvements to the building and grounds.

“This is a time of great opportunity for Rosecrance to further improve the continuum of care in our community,” Fridh said.  “I am honored and excited to represent Rosecrance in this new capacity.”

Fridh earned her B.S. in Family Social Services from Northern Illinois University and her M.S. in Child and Family Services from Northern Illinois University. She obtained a Doctorate of Psychology (PsyD.) from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University.

Fridh gained extensive clinical and leadership experience at various social service agencies in the region, including at the former Janet Wattles Center, which merged into Rosecrance three years ago. She also has been in private practice and has served as program director at a large residential facility in Texas serving teens with behavior disorders.

Dave Gomel, Rosecrance Chief Operating Officer, said Fridh takes the job at an exciting time of growth and change for the Ware Center.

“We have a lot of great opportunities ahead of us, and we have the chance to make an indelible mark in our community, region and state as a leader in community mental health/behavioral health services,” Gomel said.

Click here to download the press release.

Community Foundation, Rosecrance partner to educate public on Mental Health First Aid

ROCKFORD – Two Rosecrance staff members are among the first people in northern Illinois to be trained as instructors for a groundbreaking national initiative called Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) USA. The program is designed to educate the public about how to identify, understand and appropriately respond to people in crisis for mental health and substance use disorders.

Interest in MHFA USA is growing in response to President Barack Obama’s call to fight gun violence by devoting more resources to training teachers, police officers, clergy and other community members to recognize signs of mental health disorders and respond appropriately.

Through a $10,000 grant from the Dr. Louis and Violet Rubin Fund of the Community Foundation of Northern Illinois, Anne Fridh and Sarra Reichwald of Rosecrance have trained to become MHFA instructors. In turn, they will train local law enforcement officers and other first responders in important techniques that can de-escalate crises, connect people with appropriate care and save lives.

Three trainings for Rockford Police Department officers are set for November. More trainings will be scheduled soon for teachers and school personnel, as well as for firefighters.

“Research shows that the sooner people get help for mental health and substance use issues, the more likely they are to experience a positive outcome,” Fridh said. “This training is crucial for anyone who spends time with young people.”

Fridh, MS, Psy.D, is Director of Quality Management and Performance Improvement for Rosecrance. She is the first person in Rockford to receive certification as a Youth MHFA instructor. Fridh attended training this summer in Joplin, MO.

Reichwald, MS.Ed, Staff Educator at Rosecrance, attended training in Milwaukee in August for certification as an Adult MHFA instructor.

The training has been used across the nation for a variety of audiences and key professions, including primary care professionals, business leaders and employers, educators, corrections officers, nursing home staff, mental health authorizes and the general public.

Those who take the course learn a 5-step action plan to respond to individuals who are in a mental health crisis until they can be linked with appropriate help, possibly professional care.

That response plan is summed up by the mnemonic device ALGEE:

Assess for risk of suicide or harm.
Listen nonjudgmentally.
Give reassurance and information.
Encourage appropriate professional help.
Encourage self-help and other support strategies.

MHFA is an evidence-based training program that began in Australia and first was piloted in the United States in 2008. MHFA is a being managed in this country by the Washington D.C-based National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

WIFR-23 reports on United Way grant to Triage Center

Today on its website, WIFR-23 reports that the United Way of Rock River Valley will invest $2.7 million in the Rock River Valley, most of it in grants to community programs that “strengthen the education, income and health of communities in Winnebago and Ogle counties.”

Included among those programs is the Triage Center at the Rosecrance Ware Center in downtown Rockford. Here’s how the article describes it:

Triage Center, Rosecrance, Inc.: The Rosecrance Crisis Triage Center provides crisis care for persons experiencing a psychiatric crisis and expedites the process of assessment and referrals for persons with serious mental illness. The Triage Center also serves as an access point to all behavioral health services.

To read the entire story, click here.

For more information about the Triage Center, click here.

Register Star reports on success of Rosecrance triage center

In Sunday’s Rockford Register Star, reporter Melissa Westphal wrote about the success of the triage center at the Rosecrance Ware Center. The triage center opened in Oct. 2012 to help provide mental health services in the wake of the closing of Singer Mental Health Center:

ROCKFORD — People experiencing psychiatric crises are avoiding unnecessary  hospital stays by using a triage center that opened seven months ago in  Rockford, according to early data from Rosecrance Health Network.

Rosecrance officials had researched the idea of a triage center for more  than 10 years, but the need for such a service increased when the state closed  Singer Mental Health Center, an inpatient state hospital, in October.

So the agency renovated space at its downtown Ware Center, 526 W. State St.,  to house clinical recliner-style chairs, a kitchen and a waiting area where  clients can be assessed, stabilized and given a referral for follow-up  treatment.

The success of the center been impressive, Westphal reports:

Sixty-nine percent of those admitted were stabilized and sent home — a much higher percentage than Rosecrance officials expected.

“That’s appropriately going home with a plan — typically an appointment with a case worker or a psychiatrist,” CEO Phil Eaton said. “That’s not just being stabilized and discharged, that’s very different. What happens with that is a revolving door where you haven’t addressed the issue.”

Read the whole story here.

August edition of the Rosecrance electronic newsletter published

The August edition of the Rosecrance electronic newsletter has published. This month, we’re highlighting Rosecrance Experiential Therapies Department Supervisor Christine Nicholson, who has been invited to speak about the Rosecrance Healing Garden at the 2012 North American Japanese Garden Association national conference in Denver.

The Healing Garden at the 50-acre Rosecrance Griffin Williamson Campus was designed to enhance recovery for youth and their families. The natural materials used in the modern, welcoming treatment center complement the tranquil beauty of the six-acre garden. Together they offer a holistic healing environment that nurtures the spirits of teens in treatment for addiction.

Read the whole story here.

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Rosecrance clinician Lynn Cadmus named Illinois ‘Social Worker of the Year’

Cadmus will be considered for top national social worker title

Download this news release as a PDF

Lynn Cadmus

Rosecrance clinician Lynn Cadmus has been named Social Worker of the Year by the Illinois chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).

ROCKFORD – Rosecrance clinician Lynn Cadmus has been named Social Worker of the Year by the Illinois chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).

“I was surprised and amazed that I would be given that honor when there are others that I’m sure were very deserving,” said Cadmus. “I am very grateful to receive this recognition.”

Cadmus, who has been a member of NASW for more than 30 years, was nominated by Rosecrance Ware Center Director of Emergency Services Joan Lodge.

“Lynn Cadmus represents the highest ethical standards of social work,” Lodge said. “Her goal is always to improve the quality of life for people and for clients to know and believe that they have value.”

Cadmus is a trauma therapist with the Therapeutic Intervention Program (TIP) at the Rosecrance Ware Center. She has worked for Rosecrance since 2006.

TIP is the mental health court of Winnebago County. It was developed to reduce the number of arrests of people with mental illness, increase access to mental health treatment among individuals charged with nonviolent criminal offenses and to reduce the number of days of incarceration in the jail for people with mental illness.

Cadmus is an expert in gender-based trauma. She also is trained in Dialetical Behavioral Therapy and the treatment of personality disorders.

Cadmus’ state-level nomination qualifies her as a finalist for national recognition. An award ceremony will be held this fall to honor the statewide award winners.

According to NASW, Illinois has more than 12,000 professional social workers who dedicate their careers to helping people transform their lives or improving environments that make such progress possible. Social workers improve the fabric of society by serving as advocates for people who need help addressing serious life challenges.

NASW works to enhance the professional growth and development of its members, to create and maintain professional standards, and to advance sound social policies. With 150,000 members, NASW is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the world.



Contact:
Judy Emerson
Director of Communications
Rosecrance Health Network
1021 N. Mulford Road
Rockford, IL 61107
815.387.5605 (office); 815.262.4685 (cell)
Email: Email Judy Emerson here

About Rosecrance:
Rosecrance, a private not-for-profit organization, is a national leader in treatment for substance abuse and is one of the largest and most respected providers of community mental health services in the state. With almost 100 years of experience serving families, Rosecrance has the administrative structure, professional expertise and long-term stability to provide quality, evidence-based care for children, adolescents, adults and families who need care for substance use and mental health disorders.

July edition of the Rosecrance electronic newsletter published

The July edition of the Rosecrance electronic newsletter has published. This month, we’re highlighting the opening of Rosecrance McHenry County, which offers evidence-based outpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment services in McHenry, Illinois.

Rosecrance is dedicated to providing quality, evidence-based mental health and substance abuse treatment in an environment that fosters lasting recovery. Our programs are family centered and focus on helping clients and their loved ones develop the tools needed to rebuild their lives and reclaim what has been lost.

Read more about Rosecrance McHenry County here.

The newsletter also includes information on Rosecrance’s participation in 2012 Run for the Kids, the 13th annual Consumer Family Forum, upcoming training opportunities and more! Click here to read the newsletter.

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June edition of the Rosecrance electronic newsletter published

The June edition of the Rosecrance electronic newsletter has published. This month, we’re highlighting the story of Patrick Garcia, an alum of Rosecrance’s Homeless Veterans Program who found stability and success in recovery. Read his story here.

The newsletter also includes Rosecrance Chaplain William Lenters’ Michael Q. Ford Journalism Award, the launching of youth recovery court, giving opportunities, upcoming trainings, news and more!

Click here to read the newsletter.

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Rosecrance CEO: Unique services lead to same destination

Note: This article appears in the Spring/Summer 2012 edition of Reach, which publishes later this week. Download a PDF version of this article (1.1 mb).


Download a PDF version of this article (1.1 mb).

At a recent conference, a long-time colleague in the addiction treatment field asked to have dinner with me, and his opening question took me aback: “Where are you going with this new mental health effort?” he asked, and then he went on. “Is this a trend toward integration that we are missing? How’s it going?”

It occurred to me that some other people might be wondering where Rosecrance is heading. The wonderment may be occurring from two directions – from the substance abuse treatment perspective and from the mental health services direction. Both treatment areas have strong advocates.

To answer the last question first: The merger is going very well. On Sept. 1, we will mark the one-year anniversary of the formal merger between Rosecrance and the former Janet Wattles Center. Our early integration of services predates that by eight months, as the two organizations formally “affiliated” at the beginning of 2011.

Over 18 months, we have combined our back office functions to improve efficiencies in such areas as finance, human resources, purchasing and technology. Saving money was not the goal of the merger, but being more efficient never hurts and allows us to serve more people with the resources we have.

At the same time, we are making strides toward integrating services for people with co-occurring disorders. We are working toward a time when we can offer “one-stop shopping,” so to speak, to clients with dual diagnoses of substance use and mental health disorders. We were already doing that to some extent before the merger, and our progress in that direction continues to move forward. We are serious about recovery, and we need to treat the whole person.

Meanwhile, many of our services have remained and should remain distinct and unique from one another. Graphically, think of it this way: Say substance abuse services are contained within a yellow circle. Mental health services are in a blue circle. Push the circles together so that they overlap on one side to create a new area of green. Clients in the center need services from both sides.

While the number of clients who could rightly be placed in the green area is growing, Rosecrance still offers services that are unique to mental health and unique to substance abuse. We continue to embrace the evidence-based practices that lead to lifelong recovery, wherever the client fits in the interlocking circles.

The key concept is summed up in the word recovery. It’s where the rubber meets the road, if you’ll pardon the cliché. It is the unifying theme of what we do at Rosecrance, regardless of whether the client came to us for help with substance abuse, mental illness or both. And to my colleague who sparked this thought process: Thanks for asking.

As we continue to move our mission forward, please keep our board, our staff and the clients we serve in your prayers as we all go, by the Grace of God, one day at a time.

- Philip W. Eaton, President/CEO


Life reclaimed: Vietnam-era vet reaches goals after living on streets

Note: This article appears in the Spring/Summer 2012 edition of Reach, which publishes later this week. Download a PDF version of this article (0.9 mb).


Patrick Garcia is seen in front of a full-scale mural he painted on the Veterans of Foreign Wars building on 7th Street in Rockford. Garcia calls the mural his “comeback art.”

Patrick Garcia issues orders into a walkie talkie. A worker he supervises at the Millennium Center in Rockford applied the wrong kind of spackle to repair a hole in the wall, and Garcia doesn’t have time to take care of the situation before lunch. It’s a relatively small problem for Garcia, 58, but one he takes pride in remedying. He’s been building manager at the facility since July 2011. He considers it an amazing opportunity. And it really is, especially when you consider that just a few years ago, Garcia was homeless.

A traditional upbringing
Garcia spent the better part of his life behind bars. He endured two failed marriages. He missed out on relationships with two children. He lived on the streets. He blames all of it on drug and alcohol abuse.

But for more than five years – since 2006 – he’s been putting his life back together.
Patrick Eugene Garcia was born in 1954, in Plant City, Fla., the eldest of four children. He grew up in a traditional Catholic home – no swearing, no drinking and plenty of hard work.

Garcia describes his childhood as “exactly what you’d expect from that era.” His father was strict, but not harsh, and his mother was a nurturing homemaker. He tapped into his artistic side by the time he was 6, sneaking into his father’s study to watch him paint and draw. The discovery would spark a lifelong interest in the arts.

Garcia finds no fault in his upbringing, and doesn’t connect any dots that led to the turmoil he would encounter later in life. If you’re looking for where things began to go wrong, you could point to July of 1971, when he enlisted in the United States Army at the age of 17.

Because of his budding artistic skills, the Army trained Garcia as a medical illustrator. He remained stateside during the war in Vietnam, but developed survivor’s guilt after seeing his peers return to the U.S. with debilitating injuries. He was 18 when he began abusing substances.
“I was drinking a lot,” Garcia said. “Beer was a dollar a pitcher. It was just what you did. It’s what we all did.

“I started doing other things, too: Pot. LSD. Mescaline. Speed.”

It was the beginning of more than three decades of substance abuse. After the Army, Garcia’s abuse devolved from experimentation to addiction. It began with habitual glue sniffing, but his addiction would lead to other drugs, as well.

In trying to pay for his habit, Garcia was arrested several times for burglary and other financially motivated crimes. The abuse also cost him two marriages and relationships with his children.

“Crack cocaine was my drug,” Garcia said. “Most of my adult life – at least three quarters of it – I’ve been locked up. All of it was related to drugs or alcohol.

“None of my family wanted me around. My father passed away in ’93. I was in prison at the time.”

Road to recovery
In 2006, during his fifth stint behind bars, Garcia found himself eligible to leave prison on parole – provided he could find a residence. His case worker suggested the Rockford Rescue Mission, which would accept parolees and provide a permanent address. Without the program, Garcia would have remained behind bars until his sentence ended in January 2012.

The Mission put Garcia in a one-year recovery program and gave him an opportunity to practice his painting, drawing and other artwork – something he saw as the key to his recovery. It wasn’t long before he was commissioned to paint a full-scale mural on the Veterans of Foreign Wars building on 7th Street in Rockford.

“I found out later that my dad was very proud of my artwork, which meant a lot to me,” said Garcia. “That mural was kind of my comeback art.”

Garcia’s talent was noticed, and he was recommended to Brad Gilbaugh after completing the Mission’s program. Gilbaugh manages Rosecrance’s Homeless Veterans Program, which provides transitional housing to veterans while they search for full-time housing and employment. Garcia spent about a year and a half in Rosecrance supportive housing.
“The guy has had some tough breaks in life – all related to drugs and alcohol – but when I first met him, you could tell he had the potential to succeed,” Gilbaugh said.

Gilbaugh put Garcia in contact with Nancy Vaccaro, who gave Garcia a job at the Millennium Center drawing portraits on Friday nights. Garcia parlayed the opportunity into his current full-time job.

“He made his mind up he was going to turn his life around, and he did it,” Gilbaugh said.

Today, Patrick Garcia lives a life free of substance abuse. He’s reconciled with his
family – he plans to visit his mom, whom he hasn’t seen since 2003, in Denver later this year. He works during the week at the Millennium Center and practices his art during his off time. Local newspapers occasionally feature his artwork.

Garcia recently earned a promotion, maintaining all properties affiliated with the owners of the Millennium Center. Because of his position, he was able to offer a job to another person actively involved in Rosecrance’s Homeless Veterans Program.

“We’re very proud of Patrick,” said Susan Black, his case worker during his time in the Homeless Veterans Program, “and I know he’s very proud of himself.”

Garcia shares the credit.

“I often thank God, and the people who work in the facilities, for what they’ve done for me,” Garcia said. “I believe that being in the Homeless Veterans Program taught me to believe in myself again. I’ve had a chance to start over.”


About Rosecrance’s Homeless Veterans Program

The Homeless Veterans Program is a maximum two-year program requiring complete abstinence from substance abuse. Attendance at Veterans Affairs meetings is mandatory, and participation in Alcoholics Anonymous or other 12-Step programs is encouraged.

Program participants live in a Rosecrance-run apartment for the duration of their stay. All money paid into rent is redirected into a savings account, which is then given to the veteran at the end of program to use for living expenses.

The goal of the program is to provide transitional housing while the veteran seeks full-time employment and housing.