Monthly Archives: November 2014

Rosecrance's Dr. Thomas Wright and recovering addict Shannon featured on ABC-7 Chicago

Rosecrance’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Thomas Wright and recovering addict Shannon were featured on ABC-7 Chicago in a report on “Triple C,” cold medicine being abused by teens. Click here to read the story and watch the video.

Relocated Rosecrance Ware Center further integrates mental health, addiction services

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The Rosecrance Ware Center entrance is a bright, spacious and welcoming environment.

Rosecrance has transformed a long-vacant grocery store in Rockford, Illinois, into a modern new home for the Ware Center, helping to strengthen and integrate behavioral health services in the community.

The Ware Center delivers outpatient mental health services to more than 5,500 adults each year. The new 42,000-square-foot facility has a modern design with a spacious lobby and includes staff offices, group meeting rooms and a pharmacy.

Rosecrance President/CEO Philip Eaton said the larger space, combined with a talented, compassionate staff, helps to create a new pathway for recovery for people who suffer from serious mental illness and addictive disorders.

new_warecenter_entrance“We assessed our needs, and we set priorities to reflect our corporate values for client dignity, program space and staff and client safety, keeping the consumers’ recovery goals — not their illness — at the center of our plan,” Eaton said. “We’re building on the strengths and abilities of each individual, inspiring hope and empowering them to live purposeful lives.

“These are our citizens that we serve. These are our neighbors. And that’s who’s going to be coming to this building.”

Rosecrance has invested about $10 million during the last year to improve vacant, derelict properties in Rockford. In October, the Rosecrance Mulberry Center opened in a former plasma donation center to provide triage and crisis residential services together under one roof for people experiencing psychiatric crises. The facility is one of a kind in Illinois, and its renovation cost was aided by a state grant.

A detoxification program for clients who have co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders will start in that facility in early 2015.

The new Ware Center nearly doubles the available space for clients, staff and programs. The space is spread out across one floor as opposed to being split up among four floors at the old building.

rosecranceware_rrcThe Resource Recovery Center, an interactive space where clients can mingle, socialize and work with staff, is bigger and its entrance is just past the front desk. There’s also an art room and a chapel, a signature component of Rosecrance treatment facilities.

Bamboo doors and wall panels, real trees in the lobby and energy-efficient lighting throughout give the building a warm, welcoming feeling, as do tones of green, tan and blue.

Adult outpatient mental health services are the bulk of what’s offered at the Ware Center, but the new location also allows for the relocation of some adult and youth substance counseling and a unique outpatient substance abuse counseling program for moms involved with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services.

The goal is to treat clients in a dignified, efficient manner, no matter what they need.

“We want clients to be able to come to any door and say, ‘Here’s what is going on with me,’ which is the philosophy of the no-wrong-door approach,” said Anne Fridh, administrator of the Ware Center.

Rosecrance Ware Center relocation featured in Rockford Register Star, WIFR and WREX

Rosecrance has transformed a long-vacant grocery store along the North Main Street corridor into a modern new home for the Ware Center, where staff provides and adult clients receive outpatient mental health services. The new Ware Center was featured in several media outlets:

Rockford Register Star: “New Rosecrance Ware Center in Rockford a bright spot for the mentally ill”

WIFR: “Rosecrance breathes new life into old building”

WREX: “Rosecrance opens new Ware Center for outpatient mental health services”

First-ever Rosecrance Forum celebrates progress, legacy of the late Frank Ware

The namesake of the newly relocated Rosecrance Ware Center took center stage Tuesday, Nov. 18, during The Rosecrance Forum.
The building is named for Frank Ware, the longtime former CEO of the Janet Wattles Center. The center merged with Rosecrance in 2011, and Ware died unexpectedly shortly after.

Ware was a passionate, loving man who cared deeply about people with serious mental illness. He and Rosecrance President/CEO Phil Eaton were friends and colleagues who collaborated to serve people in the community who often were dealing with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.

forum_zenoff_wideRosecrance is moving the Ware Center from its current home (and former home of the Janet Wattles Center) at 526 W. State St. just a few miles north to 2704 N. Main St. The 42,000-square-foot former grocery store space is nearly double the size of the old location and has a comforting, modern design.

Board members, donors and other friends of Rosecrance previewed the building during the first forum event on Tuesday. Tom Furst, a longtime Rosecrance board member and chairman of The Rosecrance Forum, said the forums aim to educate people about the work we do, discuss plans for the future and inform people about important trends in behavioral health.

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Rosecrance President/CEO Philip Eaton, Rosecrance Foundation Board Chair Lisa Lindman, and Rosecrance Health Network Board Chair Jeff DiBenedetto.

Eaton joked a bit about the former grocery store space, telling various sections of the audience that they were sitting in the produce, bakery and deli departments. He noted that about a year ago, Rosecrance sold the downtown Ware Center building to Winnebago County and bought the vacant grocery store. “We assessed our needs, set priorities to reflect our corporate values for client dignity, program space and staff and client safety, keeping the consumers’ recovery goals – not their illnesses – at the center of our plan.

“We are creating a new, improved pathway of recovery for those in our community who struggle with serious mental illness and/or addictive disorders.” Illinois Appellate Judge Kathryn Zenoff delivered a moving speech about behavioral health services in the community and her work with Ware and Eaton, whom she called “extraordinary men, two reformers and dreamers.”

Zenoff worked with Ware to design, create and open a mental health court – called the Therapeutic Intervention Program (TIP) Court – in February 2005. Central to the model, both pre- and post-guilty plea for either a misdemeanor or felony, is a multidisciplinary team of legal and treatment professions who assess participants’ needs and risks and then provide what’s termed “wraparound services.”

She recalled how Ware and Eaton worked together to provide integrated dual-disorder treatment to TIP Court participants. Zenoff said after “Frank died a sudden and untimely death, Phil picked up the gauntlet for both of them.”

“It is only fitting that Frank Ware’s name will be attached to this building along with Rosecrance’s,” she said. “We need only look around us to see that aspects of the building symbolize who Frank was and what was important to him.

“The canopy out front provides shelter and welcomes all persons who enter the doors here. The trees and the greens in the planters symbolize life and recovery and renewal and hope. That was Frank’s mantra. The high ceilings symbolize Frank’s attitude that there were no hurdles too high to overcome for those who needed his help. In the warm of the wood, we can see Frank’s compassion and his caring, his commitment to see the person, not the mental illness. There is ample space here to ensure help in the future for all walking in those doors. Phil Eaton saw to that.”

Relocated Rosecrance Ware Center a bigger home for adult mental health services

Modern facility nearly doubles the space for clients, staff and programming

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Rosecrance President/CEO Philip Eaton cuts the ribbon at the Rosecrance Ware Center open house November 19, 2014.

Rosecrance has transformed a long-vacant grocery store along the North Main Street corridor into a modern new home for the Ware Center, where staff provides and adult clients receive outpatient mental health services.

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The new Rosecrance Ware Center, 2704 N. Main St. in Rockford.

Clients will start using the new Ware Center, 2704 N. Main St., next week. Programs are relocating just a few miles north from the existing Ware Center at 526 W. State St. Community members, neighbors and local officials toured the facility during an open house today.

The State Street location was the longtime home of the Janet Wattles Center, which merged with Rosecrance in 2011. Rosecrance President/CEO Philip Eaton said that while a building is just a starting place, more than 100 competent, motivated staff members are moving in to provide necessary services to a vulnerable population.

“I believe this move of our adult mental health services is an additional step in our plan to chart a new path for some of the neediest individuals in our community,” Eaton said. “It demonstrates the commitment our organization has to serve adults, families, young adults and children who struggle with serious mental illness.

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Rosecrance President/CEO Philip Eaton speaks at the Rosecrance Ware Center open house November 19, 2014.

“These are our neighbors. These are Rockford citizens. This is going to provide infrastructure to help these people grow in recovery and to heal mind, body and spirit.”

Rosecrance has committed about $10 million during the last year to improving vacant, derelict properties. In October, the Rosecrance Mulberry Center opened in a renovated space to provide triage and crisis residential services together under one roof for people experiencing psychiatric crises. The Ware Center is Rosecrance’s second building on the city’s west side.

“The space will brighten that whole North Main corridor,” Eaton said. “The lights will be on, the windows washed, the parking lot plowed, the grass mowed and the flowers planted. And in true Rosecrance tradition, Christmas lights will hang for the holidays.”

The 42,000-square-foot building features a spacious waiting area, staff offices, group meeting rooms, a pharmacy and exam rooms. It is decorated with tones of green, tan and blue that help warmly welcome visitors.

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The new Recovery Resource Center.

The Recovery Resource Center, an interactive space where clients can mingle, socialize and work with staff, has its own entrance just past the front desk.

Another signature component of the new space is a chapel because “spirituality is at the core of recovery,” Eaton said.

Substance abuse programs previously offered at Rosecrance’s River District and Court Street sites also will relocate to the new Ware Center, as will some youth programming and adult substance abuse outpatient services.

“We want clients to be able to come to any door and say, ‘Here’s what’s going on with me,’ which is the philosophy of the no wrong-door approach,” said Anne Fridh, administrator of the Ware Center.

Rosecrance did a nationwide search for architects and landed on Rockford-based Saavedra Gehlhausen Architects as the lead and partner Eckenhoff Saunders Architects in Chicago. Both firms had previous experience in health care design. Cord Construction Co. was the general contractor.

A big plus for the space will be ample parking for clients and staff. The existing Ware Center has mostly street parking and very few spaces for employees.

Eaton said Rosecrance has received a resounding warm welcome from the North Main Street corridor neighbors. People have called and sent emails welcoming the organization to the neighborhood.

Rosecrance Florian Program featured in Addiction Professional Magazine

The Rosecrance Florian Program, which addresses the complex biopsychosocial issues unique to the culture of firefighters & paramedics, was featured in Addiction Professional Magazine November 7, 2014. Click here to read the article.