Monthly Archives: December 2011

In the news: Rosecrance a partner in care at Crusader

The Rockford Register Star‘s Melissa Westphal wrote about Rosecrance’s partnership with Community Crusader Health in today’s paper.

The partnership provides a licensed clinical social worker on site at Crusader’s West State Street office to allow for immediate response for behavioral health issues.

From Westphal’s article:

Will Holm, a licensed clinical social worker with Rosecrance, is now embedded at Crusader’s West State Street clinic. His office space is on the same medical unit as primary care providers who can refer patients to him in “real time” if they identify needs during routine appointments.

Officials say this setup reduces the chances of patients skipping out on referrals for mental health assessments, therefore improving both physical and emotional treatment outcomes.

“We’re really treating the whole person, not just looking at the physical,” said Mary Ann Abate, Rosecrance’s chief operating officer of mental health.

Read the complete article on the Register Star’s website.

Video: Rosecrance's Dr. Wright comments on "Monitoring the Future" report

Earlier this month, the University of Michigan released its annual “Monitoring the Future” report. The report surveys young people anonymously about the drugs they use and the frequency at which they use them.

Rosecrance admission trends mirrored results from the report.

Click play on the video below to see a short interview about the study from Rosecrance Chief Medical Officer Dr. Thomas Wright.

“Bless us Lord, this Christmas, with quietness of mind;
Teach us to be patient and always to be kind.”
~ Helen Steiner Rice
Currier and Ives
Currier & Ives | Library of Congress
Wishing you Peace
from your friends at Rosecrance

In the news: Marijuana, synthetic drug use on the rise

WIFR-23 in Rockford spoke to Rosecrance about the recent rise in marijuana and synthetic drug use.

From the article:

The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports more teens use marijuana each year. Rehab counselors at Rosecrance say they are seeing the same thing here in the Stateline. Among the teens admitted for treatment last year, more than 70% say pot is their preferred drug. Counselors say synthetic marijuana is also a big problem.

“We have no idea what these children are ingesting when they smoking this substance and you know and we are seeing a significant increase in mental health issue based on the use of this k-2 or spice,” Rosecrance’s Andrea Kaiser said.

Read the complete article, and see the video, here.

Rosecrance Naperville offers new parent support group

Claudia Evenson is hosting a new weekly parent support group at Rosecrance’s Naperville Satellite Office, 608 S. Washington St., Suite 21, in Naperville.

The support group is for parents who suspect their children are experimenting with drugs or alcohol, or are concerned their children may have relapsed after previous treatment.

The group meets on Tuesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. Sessions are free and confidential.

The Naperville Sun published an article about the group on Dec. 20, 2011.

December edition of the Rosecrance enewsletter available

The December edition of the Rosecrance enewsletter is now available. This issue features information on how a national report about teen drug use mirrors Rosecrance admission trends, highlights from the Project SAFE program’s December graduation, a study on adolescent sleeping patterns and more.

Click here to read the newsletter.

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National report on teen drug use mirrors Rosecrance admission trends

Marijuana, synthetic drug use on the rise

Download this news release as a PDF

ROCKFORD – Marijuana use among teens across the nation rose for the fourth straight year, according to results from the highly respected annual “Monitoring the Future” survey released Dec. 14, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

In addition, the survey indicates that daily marijuana use is at a 30-year peak among high school seniors. The report stated that fewer teens perceive the drug as harmful and that disapproval of its use is dropping.

The annual survey is sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the University of Michigan. The report is considered one of the leading indicators of trends in substance use among the nation’s teenagers.

Trends in the report, which surveyed 47,000 teens in grades 8, 10 and 12, are echoed at drug treatment centers such as Rosecrance in Rockford. Dr. Thomas Wright, chief medical officer for the organization and a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist, said the report is concerning.

“Cannabis is seen as a potential gateway drug and its use may lead to other drugs and addiction issues,” he said.

Admission trends at the Rosecrance Griffin Williamson Adolescent Treatment Center mirror the big picture. Cannabis has long been the top drug of choice among youth in treatment for substance abuse, and its grip on the population has continued to rise.

Among adolescent patients admitted to treatment last year, 71.4 percent cited marijuana as their preferred drug, compared with 69.5 percent in 2010 and 67.1 percent in 2009.

Rosecrance has the largest adolescent inpatient treatment center in the state of Illinois. More than 800 adolescents receive treatment annually at the Rockford campus.

Other facts from “Monitoring the Future:”

    The proportion of young people using any illicit drug has risen steadily in recent years, primarily due to the increase in marijuana use.
    50 percent of high school seniors reported having tried an illicit drug at some time.
    40 percent of seniors had used one or more drugs in the past year.
    25 percent of seniors had used one or more drugs in the past month.

Meanwhile, the Rosecrance experience confirms other national trends highlighted in the “Monitoring the Future” survey. Alcohol use and binge drinking have gradually declined. That bit of positive news is countered by the emergence and growing use of “synthetic marijuana” products such as K2 and Spice, both of which can have harmful and even fatal consequences to users.

These new synthetic formulas have unpredictable effects. Rosecrance is treating a growing number of adolescents and young adults for abuse of these drugs. Use of Ecstasy also increased overall in the past year, while the perception of risk and disapproval of the drug declined.

The report also showed that about one-third of teens surveyed reported using energy drinks, which can be harmful if used often. Young teens consume the most energy drinks.

Q&A with Dr. Thomas Wright about the “Monitoring the Future:”

Q: The recent Monitoring the Future report said that marijuana use is on the rise among teens and that daily marijuana use among high school seniors is at a 30-year peak. Can you comment on that?

A: It’s concerning, as cannabis is seen as a potential gateway drug and its use may lead to other drugs and addiction issues.

Q: The report says that, in general, teens today don’t perceive that marijuana is harmful or risky behavior. What are you hearing from teens?

A: When patients come into treatment, this is often the case. However, part of our job is to educate the patient and families about not only the drug, but the disease of addiction.

Q: Meanwhile, the report also says that alcohol and cigarette use are on the decline among teens. Are you encouraged?

A: Well, overall drug use by any drug is still on the rise. So, while we like to see a decrease in some drugs used, there seems to be a tendency where teens just go to something else.

Q: The report also talks about the rise in use of synthetic marijuana, also known as “Spice” or “K2.” Is that also a trend among Rosecrance patients?

A: We have been seeing our patients use synthetic cannabinoids for one to two years. Now, we are beginning to see an emergence of a new hallucinogen called “Bromo-dragonfly.” The availability of this is growing and may be reflected in future data from the Monitoring the Future study.

Q: What advice do you have for parents who suspect that their teens are regular users of marijuana or other drugs?

A: Have a relationship with your teen such that you can discuss and talk to them about these things. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Learn more: http://www.nida.nih.gov/drugpages/MTF.html

Contact:
Judy Emerson
Director of Communications
Rosecrance Health Network
1021 N. Mulford Road
Rockford, IL 61107
815.387.5605 (office); 815.262.4685 (cell)
jemerson@rosecrance.org

About Rosecrance
Rosecrance is a private not-for-profit organization offering behavioral health services for more than 13,000 children, adolescents, adults and families each year. Rosecrance provides addiction treatment through inpatient and outpatient programs in the Rockford area and services at six satellite offices in Chicagoland. In addition, Rosecrance offers community mental health services in Rockford and Belvidere.

Rosecrance's Mary Ann Abate a finalist for Rockford Woman of the Year

Mary Ann Abate, chief operating officer of mental health for Rosecrance Health Network, has been named a finalist for Rockford Woman magazine’s Rockford Woman of the Year award.

From the Rockford Register Star:

This year’s finalists for Rockford Woman of the Year are the chief operating officer of mental health for Rosecrance Health Network, chief executive officer of the YWCA of Rockford, partner and chief executive officer of KMK Media Group, executive director of Northern Illinois Hospice and Grief Center, and the founder of the Cinco de Mayo 5K race scholarship, which raises funds for Latino high school graduates in Boone County.

These five outstanding “Rockford Women” were chosen by the magazine’s advisory board from 40 nominees. One will be selected Rockford Woman of the Year 2012.

Meet the five finalists for the award here.

Read Rockford Woman magazine’s profile on Abate here.

17 women graduate from Rosecrance SAFE program

SAFE program helps women regain or retain custody of children

Download this news release as a PDF

ROCKFORD – One by one, graduates from Rosecrance’s Project SAFE program took the microphone on Dec. 9 at Court Street United Methodist Church to list the things for which they are grateful.

The graduation took place during the 25th anniversary year for the program, which serves women who have lost custody of their children or are in danger of it because of their substance abuse. Rosecrance has offered the program without interruption since becoming a pilot site in 1986. The program is a collaboration between the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) and the Illinois Department of Human Services/Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse. SAFE stands for Substance Abuse Free Environment.

Gratitude abounded among the 17 graduates at the event Dec. 9 at the church, which now hosts the Rosecrance SAFE program and is the daycare location for participants’ young children. Most graduates were in tears as they made their remarks.

Kathy: “I am so glad to be sober, right now, today.”

Debbie: “I’m thankful for my children being back at home, for recovery and for happiness.”

Sara: “I want to thank my mom and my family for never giving up on me.”

Janet: “I’m thankful for my kids and that they were taken care of while I went through this. I’m grateful for a second chance.”

Graduate Michelle addressed her counselors and program supervisor Mary Ann Kelly of Rosecrance directly: “In the beginning, it was a love-hate relationship, but you have taught me a lot. You taught me how to live, and I don’t know where I’d be without you. I am truly grateful today.”

After 25 years and hundreds of graduates, Rosecrance is the largest Project SAFE site in the state. DCFS has hailed the program as one of the most successful of its kind in Illinois.

Treatment involves as many as 12 hours of intensive outpatient services each week and may go on for months. Participants may receive transportation to and from treatment if they need it, and their young children attend daycare at the same location. The women also receive parenting education and case management services from a Rosecrance outreach worker.

The treatment approach is tailored to meet the special needs of mothers who are struggling with addiction. The goal is for the women to get into recovery, regain custody of their children or end DCFS oversight of their families by succeeding in the program. A few women in the program are not DCFS-involved, but they, too, have substance abuse issues that affect their parenting.

Currently, 35 women are in the SAFE program and are working toward graduation, which is held twice a year for those who are successful in treatment.

Kelly and her staff led the 17 graduates through a ceremony that has been used dozens of times through the years for hundreds of women who have completed the program. After a candle-lighting ceremony, expressions of gratitude and family remarks, graduates received gifts and certificates from Kelly, primary counselor Julianna Sliger and outreach worker Sue Stevenson.

Contact:

Judy Emerson
Director of Communications
Rosecrance Health Network
1021 N. Mulford Road
Rockford, IL 61107
815.387.5605 (office); 815.262.4685 (cell)
jemerson@rosecrance.org

About Rosecrance
Rosecrance is a private not-for-profit organization offering behavioral health services for more than 13,000 children, adolescents, adults and families each year. Rosecrance provides addiction treatment through inpatient and outpatient programs in the Rockford area and services at six satellite offices in Chicagoland. In addition, Rosecrance offers community mental health services in Rockford and Belvidere.

A special thank you to our legislators

On November 29, the Illinois legislature passed Senate Bill 2412, which restored cuts to several human service programs, including millions of dollars to community mental health and substance abuse funding.

Our local state senators and representatives all voted to approve the bill.

From all of us at Rosecrance, we thank Senator Christine J. Johnson, Senator Dave Syverson, Representative Chuck Jefferson and Representative David Winters.